Davidsabbath thewriteroom.org winner grand prize

Meet Our 2015 Winner: David Sabbath

Davidsabbath thewriteroom.org winner grand prizeIntroducing our 2015 Grand Prize winner for Best Screenplay:

David Sabbath is a director/writer living in Columbus, Ohio.  His international and national commercials have received 57 advertising awards for his direction.  As the writer/director, his feature film God Don’t Make The Laws was awarded best picture at the 2012 LA Film and Video Festival.  For his writing, David has receive the New Star Award at the 2013 Madrid International Film Festival; Best Movie Script and Best New Writer at the 2012 American International Film Festival; Gold Award from the 2012 California Film Festival and was just accepted to the 2016 Pasadena Film Festival.

Writer/Director JT Mollner On His New Western, Outlaws and Angels

by Ashley Scott Meyers

In this episode I talk with screenwriter and director JT Mollner about his latest feature film, Outlaws and Angels starring Luke Wilson. We talk through his early career writing and directing short films and how he ultimately got his recent film produced.

You can listen to the audio portion of the podcast by clicking here or through iTunes by clicking here.

You can also read a transcript of this episode.

Source: LA-Screenwriter

7 Ways Besides Sales to Make Money Off your Novel

When my first novel came out, my publisher’s PR department had me write articles for magazines, websites and book bloggers to promote my book.

It’s difficult to say exactly which pieces drove sales and put royalties in my pocket, but one thing was sure: I wrote a lot of free material.

A chat with a writing colleague led me to approach the release of my second book a different way. We realized that even though essays and articles are traditionally used to generate income via book sales for non-fiction work, we know there is money to be made writing articles and personal essays.

We often use our lives as inspiration for writing, so why not use our books as a prompt for material we could get paid to write?

Here’s part 1 of 2 on how to exploit your novel for additional publishable material.

1. Location, location, location

Where is your novel set? New York, Teheran, Moscow or Buenos Aires? Wherever it is, chances are you can find something interesting about the locale and write an essay about it.

Keep an eye on the news coming out of that place, choose an angle that would connect that news to the action in your novel, and pitch away.  

2. Setting

Where have you set your scenes? Do your characters visit spas, go to museums, jump off buildings, or hide in caves? Wherever they are, you can probably come up with an article that could include one of your chosen settings.

How about “Ten most visited caves in the world”? Or “Spas made famous by novelists?” Or “Buildings that remind people of dragons”? You get the idea.

Travel and airline magazines can pay well for these kinds of articles.

3. Food

Chances are, your characters eat at some point in your narrative. Whether it’s a simple breakfast of scrambled eggs or an exquisite five-star Michelin dinner, you can get mileage out of any and all food mentions in your work.

Write a round-up of most common breakfast dishes in the world. Or create a listicle of hardest-to-get-into Michelin-starred restaurants. Or combine the two ideas and see if you can find Michelin-starred restaurants that serve breakfasts.

The sky’s the limit when it comes to food — and food-based ideas you can extract from your work.

Look for magazines aimed at food lovers — there’s no shortage of the latter, though pay can vary.

4. Accessories

Does your character like luxury brands? Do you write erotica and include adult toys in your narrative? Or is there perhaps a furniture theme?

Take a look at your novel and make a list of every accessory that makes a notable appearance. Brainstorm the angle you could take on those accessories. “Most popular high-end brands in fiction” or “Sex toys through the eyes of 10 characters” could make quite an interesting piece.

Consumer-focused websites for specific industries often look for these types of articles.

make money writing

5. Your characters

Is your hero based on a real-life crush? Does an old boss make an appearance?

You don’t have to name names, but if there’s a story behind the story, there’s a market for it.

Whether you’re in hiding from the North Koreans because you’ve made fun of Kim Jong-un or your book centers on that time you were betrayed by your best friend, you can write a personal essay about it. (Just make sure you do it under a pen name so no dictators can put you on their A-list).

You may be able to look for publications that profile famous people. The higher the profile, the bigger the publication that might be interested.  

6. Your research

Not everything in your book came straight from your imagination. Some of it came from Google and other research portals.

Did you find yourself deleting your browser history in case the FBI wondered why you were looking up how long it takes someone to die of hemlock poisoning? Or are you now an expert on apple breeds in 18th century France?

If so, there’s a probably a publication out there on just that niche. Alternatively, it might fit into a more general-interest piece. If you went down the rabbit hole researching trivia for your novel, readers will be just as curious.

Sites like Mental Floss, Ozy and The Atlantic are full of quirky and interesting articles that may inspire a new way to share your research.

7. Lessons

Your characters learned and grew through the events you wrote for them.

Whether it was how to get over a broken heart, or fix their finances and get out of debt, or to make amazing cupcakes, those characters must have top notch advice for others wanting to do the same thing.

How-to articles, especially food-based, can find homes in all kinds of publications.

Do you have any ideas for themes and topics inspired by your books?

In part 2, we’ll show you how to turn you — the writer — into a source of money-making, book-promoting essays.

The post 7 Ways Besides Sales to Make Money Off your Novel appeared first on The Write Life.

     

Source: Writer Life

6 Lucrative Freelance Writing Clients to Add To Your Portfolio

When freelance writers look for work, they often look in the same few places. They pitch their favorite blogs, they email the one client who hired them a year ago and they try to figure out which Craigslist posts are scams.

Meanwhile, there’s writing all around you that you’re not seeing. Book jacket blurbs, product descriptions and more — and all those words need writers.

Last year, we released 71 Ways to Make Money as a Freelance Writer, packed with writing gigs you might not yet have considered.

I helped put this ebook together, and I wanted to highlight six of these options. Consider these six new clients to add to your portfolio.

1. Corporate blogs

If you’re not already blogging for corporate websites, it’s time to get involved in this lucrative market.

Companies are often very interested in having talented writers compose informative articles for the blog section of their website — I’ve written articles about A/B testing and landing page copywriting for Unbounce, for example — and they generally pay $200-$300 per piece.

Ask your editors if they know anyone looking for a business blogger, and get ready to feature your best corporate clips on your writer’s website to attract more clients.

Corporate writing can be a great way to build relationships that lead to even more corporate jobs; for example, you could get paid to write About Page copywriting or white papers.

2. Authors who need book-jacket blurbs

This writing gig is right under our noses — literally — but most writers never consider book jacket writing as a potential client opportunity. Once you get book-jacket clients on your roster, you can earn $300-$600 or more for every blurb you write. Plus, think of all the great books you’ll get to read before everybody else does!

How do you get book jacket clients? Here’s what we suggest in 71 Ways:

Add this service to your website, spread the word to your network, and offer it as an add-on option for clients whose books you’re editing or formatting for Kindle.

If that feels like a lot of work, don’t forget — all that practice blurbing your own skills will make you a great book jacket writer!

3. Authors who need editing

See that “clients whose books you’re editing or formatting for Kindle,” above? If you don’t have any freelance editing clients currently in your portfolio, it’s time to add them. If you drop into our Facebook group, for example, you’ll notice writers asking where they can find good editors for their work. Why not market yourself as the answer to their question?

Write up a list of the services you provide — proofreading, formatting, constructive critiques — and figure out a fair rate for your services. We suggest $30 to $100 an hour depending on the project size and scope.

4. Businesses that need product descriptions

Every product description you see, either online or in a catalog, was written by someone.

Product descriptions are usually relatively easy to put together — you’ll get a list of product attributes to include, and it’s your job to craft those features into descriptive text — and you can make anywhere from $25 to $150 per hour.

How do you get these clients? Start looking for job listings on sites like Indeed, or use your network and ask your current clients (or your writing-forum friends) if they know of anyone looking for catalog copy work.

If you’ve already got a copywriting job or two in your portfolio, you’ll be in an even better position to get some great leads.

5. Fan-fiction readers

Yes, it’s time to get paid for writing fan fiction. Amazon Kindle Worlds will pay writers 35 percent on sales for 10,000+ word stories on The Vampire Diaries, G.I. Joe, Gossip Girl and more.

Why not try your hand at some fan fiction and see if you can gain a few fans in the process?

6. Yourself

As a writer, you need to be your first and best client. This means figuring out how to earn as much money from your own work as possible: monetizing your blog with sidebar ads, using affiliate programs to earn money by promoting your favorite writing tools, creating and marketing your own digital products and Kindle books, and even holding your own classes and webinars.

So take a look at your current writer’s website and portfolio and see how you can improve it.

Imagine if you were working for someone else, and that person asked you how they could make money off their website. Then, incorporate those suggestions. Or, take a look at your favorite writers’ websites, figure out how they’re monetizing their sites, and borrow those ideas.

Try spending the next month working towards landing one of these six freelance writing clients. Then take a look around you and see what other writing opportunities you might have missed — or read 71 Ways to Make Money as a Freelance Writer for more ideas.

What’s the most unusual writing gig you’ve landed? Share your stories in the comments!

The post 6 Lucrative Freelance Writing Clients to Add To Your Portfolio appeared first on The Write Life.

     

Source: Writer Life

Where to Submit Short Stories: 23 Magazines and Websites That Want Your Work

Not sure where to send those great short stories you’ve written?

As with writing contests and fellowships, sometimes it can be hard to know where to begin. To help you figure out where to submit short stories, we’ve put together this guide to 23 publications that publish short fiction. The list includes a mix of publications across various genres and styles, ranging from prestigious, highly competitive options to those specifically seeking new and emerging voices.

While we’ll give you a brief idea of the flavor of each magazine and site, you’ll definitely want to spend some time reading your target publications before submitting to become familiar with the sort of pieces they prefer. And before hitting “send,” make sure you’re not making any of these submission mistakes!

Ready to get started? Here are 23 outlets that publish short stories.

1. The New Yorker

Might as well start with a bang, right? Adding publication in The New Yorker to your portfolio puts you in a whole new league, though it won’t be easy. Author David. B. Comfort calculated the odds of an acceptance at 0.0000416 percent!

It accepts both standard short fiction as well as humorous short fiction for the “Shouts & Murmurs” section. No word counts are mentioned, though a quick scan of the column shows most pieces are 600 to 1,000 words.

Submission Guidelines: http://www.newyorker.com/about/contact

Deadline: Open

Payment: Huge bragging rights; pay for unsolicited submissions isn’t specified. Who Pays Writers lists several paid pieces, though as of this post’s publication, no rates specifically for short stories.

2. The Atlantic

Another highly respected magazine, The Atlantic publishes both big names and emerging writers in fiction and nonfiction. Submission guidelines advise, “A general familiarity with what we have published in the past is the best guide to what we’re looking for.”

Submission Guidelines: http://www.theatlantic.com/faq/#Submissions

Deadline: Open

Payment: Unsolicited submissions are generally unpaid, although if the editors choose your piece for online content, you may receive $100-$200 depending on genre and length.

3. The Threepenny Review

This quarterly arts magazine focuses on literature, arts and society, memoir and essay. Short stories should be no more than 4,000 words, while submissions to the “Table Talk” section (pithy, irreverent and humorous musings on culture, art, politics and life) should be 1,000 words or less.

Submission Guidelines: http://www.threepennyreview.com/submissions.html

Deadline: January to June

Payment: $400 for short stories; $200 for Table Talk pieces

4. Zoetrope: All-Story

Founded by Francis Ford Coppola and Adrienne Brodeur in 1997, Zoetrope: All-Story’s mission is “to explore the intersection of story and art, fiction and film” and “form a bridge to storytellers at large, encouraging them to work in the natural format of a short story.” Submissions should be no more than 7,000 words.

Submission Guidelines: http://www.all-story.com/submissions.cgi

Deadline: Open

Payment: None, but this magazine has discovered many emerging writers and published big names like Salman Rushdie and Gabriel García Márquez, so publication here could win you some serious prestige points.

5. One Story

One Story is just what the name says: a literary magazine that publishes one great short story every three to four weeks, and nothing more.

Its main criteria for a great short story? One “that leaves readers feeling satisfied and [is] strong enough to stand alone.” Stories can be any style or subject but should be between 3,000 and 8,000 words.

Submission Guidelines: http://www.one-story.com/index.php?page=submit

Deadline: September 1 to May 31

Payment: $500 plus 25 contributor copies

6. The Antioch Review

The Antioch Review rarely publishes more than three short stories per issue, but its editors are open to new as well as established writers. Authors published here often wind up in Best American anthologies and as the recipients of Pushcart prizes.

To make the cut, editors say, “It is the story that counts, a story worthy of the serious attention of the intelligent reader, a story that is compelling, written with distinction.” Word count is flexible, but pieces tend to be under 5,000.

Submission Guidelines: http://review.antiochcollege.org/guidelines

Deadline: Open except for the period of June 1 to September 1

Payment: $20 per printed page plus two contributor copies

7. AGNI

Thought-provoking is the name of the game if you want to get published in AGNI. Its editors look for pieces that hold a mirror up to the world around us and engage in a larger, ongoing cultural conversation about nature, mankind, the society we live in and more.

There are no word limits, but shorter is generally better; “The longer a piece is, the better it needs to be to justify taking up so much space in the magazine,” note the submission guidelines.

Submission Guidelines: http://www.bu.edu/agni/submit.html

Deadline: Open September 1 to May 31

Payment: $10 per printed page (up to a max of $150) plus a year’s subscription, two contributor’s copies and four gift copies

23shortstories

8. Barrelhouse

Published by an independent nonprofit literary organization, Barrelhouse’s biannual print journal  and online issue seek to “bridge the gap between serious art and pop culture.” Its editors look for quality writing that’s also edgy and funny — as they say, they “want to be your weird Internet friend.”

There’s no hard word count, but try to keep your submission under 8,000 words.

Submission Guidelines: http://www.barrelhousemag.com/submissions

Deadline: Currently open for books, comics, and a few other categories. Check the webpage to see all open categories and sign up for the newsletter to learn as soon as new open categories are announced.

Payment: $50 plus two contributor copies (print journal); unpaid (online issue)

9. Cincinnati Review

The Cincinnati Review publishes work by writers of all genres and at all points of their careers. Its editors want “work that has energy,” that is “rich in language and plot structure” and “that’s not just ecstatic, but that makes is reader feel ecstatic, too.”

Fiction and nonfiction submissions should be no more than 40 double-spaced pages.

Submission Guidelines: http://www.cincinnatireview.com/#/submissions/guidelines

Deadline: August 15 to March 15

Payment: $25 per double-spaced page

10. The First Line

This cool quarterly is all about jumpstarting that pesky writer’s block. Each issue contains short fiction stories (300-5,000 words) that each begin with the same pre-assigned first line. You can also write a nonfiction critical essay (500-800 words) about your favorite first line from a piece of literary work.

If you really want to get ambitious, you can also write a four-part story that uses each of that year’s first lines (which is due by the next year’s spring issue deadline). To find each issue’s assigned first line, check out the submission guidelines below.

Submission Guidelines: http://www.thefirstline.com/submission.htm

Deadline: February 1 (spring); May 1 (summer); August 1 (fall); November 1 (winter)

Payment: $25 to $50 (fiction); $25 (nonfiction) plus a contributor’s copy

11. The Georgia Review

Another one high on the prestige list, The Georgia Review features a wide variety of essays, fiction, book reviews and more across a wide range of topics. You can read specific requirements for each in the submission guidelines below, but the common theme among them all is quality, quality, quality.

Bear in mind submitting requires a $3 processing fee if you’re not a subscriber.

Submission Guidelines: http://garev.uga.edu/submissions.html

Deadline: Open except for the period of May 15 to August 15

Payment: $50 per printed page

12. Boulevard Magazine

Boulevard Magazine is always on the lookout for “less experienced or unpublished writers with exceptional promise.” It accepts prose pieces (fiction and nonfiction) up to 8,000 words (note: no science fiction, erotica, westerns, horror, romance or children’s stories).

There is a submission fee of $3.

Submission Guidelines: http://www.boulevardmagazine.org/guidelines/

Deadline: Open October 1 to May 1

Payment: $100 to $300

13. Camera Obscura

Camera Obscura is a biannual independent literary journal that publishes contemporary literary fiction and photography. Fiction should be between 250 and 8,000 words, although its editors have made exceptions for the occasional “exceptional novella” between 12,000 and 30,000 words.

You can also try your hand at a “Bridge the Gap” piece, where you review the current photo gallery and construct a story that “Takes the reader on an unexpected journey from the first image to the next.”

Submission Guidelines: http://www.obscurajournal.com/guidelines.php

Deadline: Stay tuned to the guidelines page to find out when the next deadline is announced.

Payment: $1,000 to one featured writer published in each issue, as determined by the editors; all other contributors receive two copies of the issue in which they are published. The best Bridge the Gap piece receives $50.

14. Crazyhorse

Open to a wide variety of fiction from mainstream to avant-garde, Crazyhorse puts no limitations on style or form. If you’ve got something people haven’t seen before and won’t be able to forget, its editors are looking for it.

Crazyhorse also accepts nonfiction of any sort, including memoirs, journal entries, obituaries, etc. — we told you it’s open to anything! Keep your word count between 2,500 and 8,500 words.

Submission Guidelines: http://crazyhorse.cofc.edu/submit/

Deadline: Open for submissions from September 1 to May 31, except for the month of January (when it only accepts entries for the Crazyhorse Prizes)

Payment: $20 per printed page (up to a max of $200)

15. Story

Story Magazine is, you guessed it, all about the story, whatever shape it takes. Each issue is based around a theme, but its editors encourage writers to think outside the box when it comes to how to address that theme — fiction, nonfiction, hybrid forms, “hermit-crab essays” and more are all up for consideration.

Submission Guidelines: http://www.storymagazine.org/submit/

Deadline: Open January 1 to May 1 (print magazine); open February, April, June, August, and October (online)

Payment: Not specified

16. Vestal Review

Prefer to keep your short stories extremely short? Vestal Review publishes flash fiction of no more than 500 words. Its editors are open to all genres except for syrupy romance, hard science fiction and children’s stories, and they have a special fondness for humor. R-rated content is OK, but stay away from anything too racy, gory or obscene.

Submission Guidelines: http://www.vestalreview.net/Guidelines41.html

Deadline:  Submission periods are February to May and August to November

Payment: Ten cents per word (for stories up to 100 words); five cents per word (101-200 words); three cents per word (201-500 words). “Stories of great merit” in their estimation can receive up to a $25 flat fee.

17. Flash Fiction Online

Flash Fiction Online allows for slightly longer flash stories — between 500 and 1,000 words. Its editors like sci-fi and fantasy but are open to all genres. As with Vestal, stay away from the heavier stuff like erotica and violence. As of March 1, 2015, FFO accepts previously published works.

Submission Guidelines: http://flashfictiononline.com/main/submission-guidelines/

Deadline: Open

Payment: $60 per story, two cents per word for reprints

18. Black Warrior Review

Black Warrior Review publishes a mix of work by up-and-coming writers and nationally known names. Fiction pieces of up to 7,000 words should be innovative, challenging and unique; its editors value “absurdity, hybridity, the magical [and] the stark.”

BWR also accepts flash fiction under 1,000 words and nonfiction pieces (up to 7,000 words) that examine and challenge beliefs and boundaries. There is a $3 submission fee.

Submission Guidelines: http://bwr.ua.edu/submit/guidelines/

Deadline: Submission periods are December 1 to March 1 and June 1 to September 1

Payment: A one-year subscription to BWR and a nominal lump-sum fee (amount not disclosed in its guidelines)

19. The Sun Magazine

The Sun Magazine offers some of the biggest payments we’ve seen, and while its guidelines specifically mention personal writing and provocative political/cultural pieces, they also say editors are “open to just about anything.”

Works should run no more than 7,000 words. Submit something the editors love, and you could get a nice payday.

Submission Guidelines: http://thesunmagazine.org/about/submission_guidelines/writing

Deadline: Open

Payment: A one-year subscription plus $300 to $2,000 (nonfiction) or $300 to $1,500 (fiction)

20. Virginia Quarterly (VQR)

A diverse publication that features both award-winning and emerging writers, VQR accepts short fiction (2,000 to 8,000 words) but is not a fan of genre work like romance, sci-fi, etc. It also takes nonfiction (3,500 to 9,000 words) like travel essays that examine the world around us.

Submission Guidelines: http://www.vqronline.org/about-vqr/submissions

Deadline: Submission periods are June 15 to July 31 and October 1 to November 15. VQR also accepts nonfiction pitches from June 15 to December 1.

Payment: Generally $1,000 and above for short fiction and prose (approximately 25 cents per word) with higher rates for investigative reporting; $100 to $200 for content published online.

21. Ploughshares

Ploughshares’ award-winning literary journal is published by Boston’s Emerson College. They accept fiction and nonfiction under 6,000 words and require a $3 service fee if you submit online (it’s free to submit by mail, though they prefer digital submissions).

Submission Guidelines: https://www.pshares.org/submit/journal/guidelines

Deadline: June 1 at noon EST through January 15 at noon EST

Payment: $25 per printed page (for a minimum of $50 per title and a maximum of $250 per author).

22. Shimmer

Shimmer “encourages authors of all backgrounds to write stories that include characters and settings as diverse and wondrous as the people and places of the world we live in.”

Traditional sci-fi and fantasy need not apply; Shimmer’s editors are after contemporary fantasy and “speculative fiction” with strong plots, characters and emotional core — the more unique the better. Keep your stories under 7,500 words (4,000 words is around the sweet spot).

Submission Guidelines: http://www.shimmerzine.com/guidelines/fiction-guidelines/

Deadline: Opens for submissions on September 4

Payment: Five cents per word (for a minimum of $50)

23. Daily Science Fiction

Sci-fi and fantasy writers, this one’s for you. Daily Science Fiction is looking for character-driven fiction, and the shorter, the better. While their word count range is 100 to 1,500 words, they’re especially eager to get flash fiction series (several flash stories based around a central theme), science fiction, fantasy, and slipstream.

Submission Guidelines: http://dailysciencefiction.com/submit

Deadline: Open except for the period between December 24 to January 2

Payment: Eight cents per word, with the possibility of additional pay for reprints in themed Daily Science Fiction anthologies

Where to find more places to submit your short stories

These 23 magazines and online publications are just a small subset of what’s out there. For more potential places to share your short fiction, check out the following resources, several of which helped us compile this list:

Do you write short stories? Where have you submitted them?

This post was originally published in May 2015. We’ve updated it to reflect the most accurate information available. 

The post Where to Submit Short Stories: 23 Magazines and Websites That Want Your Work appeared first on The Write Life.

     

Source: Writer Life

How Writing for More Clients Helps Your Freelance Writing Career

A good freelancer knows when it’s time to say goodbye to a client in order to take on a bigger opportunity — but a good freelancer also knows that putting all of your eggs into one large client basket isn’t necessarily the best idea.

Do you always have to drop a client when you start working for a new one?

This month, I explain why keeping a few of my favorite clients helps my career.

Here are my numbers for June:

Completed pieces: 58

Work billed: $5,586.47

Income received: $4,119.11

Here’s a fun fact: I wrote just about 40,000 words in June — the same number of words that I wrote in June of last year. I wrote 58 pieces this June, and 54 pieces last June. I also billed $5,805 in June 2015, which is slightly more money than I billed in June 2016.



The difference is that in June 2015, my year-to-date billings totaled $30,515. This year, they’re $34,288. My earnings continue to grow, year over year.

The other difference is that in June 2015, I wrote for eleven different clients. In June 2016, I wrote for seven clients. Adding higher-paying clients to your portfolio means needing fewer clients to hit your monthly income goal.

I could probably reduce my client load even further, but I don’t want to. Let’s look at why.

Keeping my byline in the conversation

At this point, the majority of my income — and the majority of my workload — comes from two clients. My other clients take up less than 25 percent of my writing time. They also bring in less than 25 percent of my income.

Why do I keep writing for these additional clients? First, because I’ve been working for each of them for years now and I have a good relationship with their editors. Second, because I can complete their assignments quickly and easily; these no-stress gigs are fun to write.

Most importantly, however, I keep writing for these clients because they keep my byline in the conversation.

Having bylines in two publications is great. Having bylines in six or seven publications is better.

My readers don’t know how long it took me to write a piece or how much I got paid to write it. All they know is that they read something worth commenting on or sharing on social media.

The more writing I do for high-quality publications with strong readerships, the more my work is shared and discussed — and more people have the chance to see my byline and become familiar with my writing.

I also like writing for multiple publications because it gives me more opportunities for referrals.

The more editors I work with, the more people I have to recommend me or connect me to gigs — and because I have a larger chance of another editor reading something of mine, liking it and offering me a job.

I know that my two biggest clients won’t last forever. When it’s time for me to start looking for a new client, I’ll have a larger pool of resources to draw from.

I’ll also continue earning income even if one of my big clients goes away.

A year of routine

In last June’s Tracking Freelance Earnings, I wrote about wanting to change my writing routine to make more time for exercise and breaks — and to make sure I got up and got out of my pajamas right away, instead of working in my PJs until noon.

I’m happy to inform you that this new routine stuck. I’m still working off the same basic schedule and work plan that I built for myself last year, and giving myself time to wake up, have breakfast, do my yoga practice and get dressed before I start my workday.

I’m also giving myself a lunch break, which has evolved into a lunch-and-half-hour-walk break. It’s great to spend that half hour outdoors, away from my computer.



Sure, there’s the occasional day that I wake up to an email that has to be answered right away, or a revision request that a client wants ASAP, but I’d say I get to keep this routine at least 90 percent of the time.

I’m still doing pretty well with keeping regular hours, too; I rarely write in the evenings anymore, although I still end up doing a little bit of work over the weekend.

I’d love to see where I am a year from now. Ideally, I’d like to be pretty much where I am today: writing for clients I really like, earning more money than I did the year before and sticking to a routine that keeps me healthy and productive.

What about you?

How does your freelance career compare to where it was last year? Where would you like to see it grow next year?

The post How Writing for More Clients Helps Your Freelance Writing Career appeared first on The Write Life.

Source: Writer Life

How Writing for More Clients Helps Your Freelance Writing Career

A good freelancer knows when it’s time to say goodbye to a client in order to take on a bigger opportunity — but a good freelancer also knows that putting all of your eggs into one large client basket isn’t necessarily the best idea.

Do you always have to drop a client when you start working for a new one?

This month, I explain why keeping a few of my favorite clients helps my career.

Here are my numbers for June:

Completed pieces: 58

Work billed: $5,586.47

Income received: $4,119.11

Here’s a fun fact: I wrote just about 40,000 words in June — the same number of words that I wrote in June of last year. I wrote 58 pieces this June, and 54 pieces last June. I also billed $5,805 in June 2015, which is slightly more money than I billed in June 2016.



The difference is that in June 2015, my year-to-date billings totaled $30,515. This year, they’re $34,288. My earnings continue to grow, year over year.

The other difference is that in June 2015, I wrote for eleven different clients. In June 2016, I wrote for seven clients. Adding higher-paying clients to your portfolio means needing fewer clients to hit your monthly income goal.

I could probably reduce my client load even further, but I don’t want to. Let’s look at why.

Keeping my byline in the conversation

At this point, the majority of my income — and the majority of my workload — comes from two clients. My other clients take up less than 25 percent of my writing time. They also bring in less than 25 percent of my income.

Why do I keep writing for these additional clients? First, because I’ve been working for each of them for years now and I have a good relationship with their editors. Second, because I can complete their assignments quickly and easily; these no-stress gigs are fun to write.

Most importantly, however, I keep writing for these clients because they keep my byline in the conversation.

Having bylines in two publications is great. Having bylines in six or seven publications is better.

My readers don’t know how long it took me to write a piece or how much I got paid to write it. All they know is that they read something worth commenting on or sharing on social media.

The more writing I do for high-quality publications with strong readerships, the more my work is shared and discussed — and more people have the chance to see my byline and become familiar with my writing.

I also like writing for multiple publications because it gives me more opportunities for referrals.

The more editors I work with, the more people I have to recommend me or connect me to gigs — and because I have a larger chance of another editor reading something of mine, liking it and offering me a job.

I know that my two biggest clients won’t last forever. When it’s time for me to start looking for a new client, I’ll have a larger pool of resources to draw from.

I’ll also continue earning income even if one of my big clients goes away.

A year of routine

In last June’s Tracking Freelance Earnings, I wrote about wanting to change my writing routine to make more time for exercise and breaks — and to make sure I got up and got out of my pajamas right away, instead of working in my PJs until noon.

I’m happy to inform you that this new routine stuck. I’m still working off the same basic schedule and work plan that I built for myself last year, and giving myself time to wake up, have breakfast, do my yoga practice and get dressed before I start my workday.

I’m also giving myself a lunch break, which has evolved into a lunch-and-half-hour-walk break. It’s great to spend that half hour outdoors, away from my computer.



Sure, there’s the occasional day that I wake up to an email that has to be answered right away, or a revision request that a client wants ASAP, but I’d say I get to keep this routine at least 90 percent of the time.

I’m still doing pretty well with keeping regular hours, too; I rarely write in the evenings anymore, although I still end up doing a little bit of work over the weekend.

I’d love to see where I am a year from now. Ideally, I’d like to be pretty much where I am today: writing for clients I really like, earning more money than I did the year before and sticking to a routine that keeps me healthy and productive.

What about you?

How does your freelance career compare to where it was last year? Where would you like to see it grow next year?

The post How Writing for More Clients Helps Your Freelance Writing Career appeared first on The Write Life.

Source: Writer Life